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Chapter 14. Burns & Other Thermal Injuries

Burn severity can be informed by each of the following except

A. Fraction of body surface area affected

B. Patient’s age

C. Death of others in the same incident

D. Accompanying other major trauma

E. Concurrent inhalational injury

C. Death of others in same incident

Hypermetabolism after burn injuries

A. Can contribute to coagulopathy

B. Causes a disproportionate loss of muscle mass

C. Can approach a threefold increase in basal metabolic rate after severe burns

D. Can be slowed with beta-adrenergic blockade

E. Is not catabolic and can be limited by decreased caloric intake

A. Can contribute to coagulopathy

Care of the burn wound may include each of the following except

A. Closed method occlusive dressings with twice daily dressing changes

B. May accompany tension pneumothorax

C. Exposure therapy with topical agents applied to uncovered areas of the face

D. Primary management with bismuth-containing antimicrobial topical agents

E. Temporary coverage with a skin substitute

D. Primary management with bismuth-containing antimicrobial topical agents

Maintenance of functional motion during burn wound healing

A. Benefits from early consideration with functional position splinting and active motion

B. Is benefitted, in general, by the tendency of the wounds to contract

C. Suffers after early skin grafting due to promotion of wound contracture

D. Is easier to maintain around joints due to increased natural motion

E. A and C

A. Benefits from early consideration with functional position splinting and active motion

Respiratory compromise after burn wounds is commonly due to

A. Early pulmonary emboli (12-36 hours after injury)

B. Inhalational injury

C. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema

D. Fungal bronchitis

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