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Chapter 12. Shock & Acute Pulmonary Failure in Surgical Patients

Shock can be caused by

A. Depletion of intravascular volume

B. Loss of autonomic control of the vasculature

C. Severe untreated systemic inflammation

D. Both A and C

E. All of A, B, and C

E. All of A, B, and C

Hypothermia in hemorrhagic shock

A. Is of limited risk in the initial 24 hours after injury

B. Can contribute to coagulopathy

C. Is unusual in the trauma population outside of cold-weather or water-immersion injuries

D. Is best treated by warming the ambient room temperature

E. Is a secondary concern that can be addressed after the care of injuries

B. Can contribute to coagulopathy

Cardiac or great vessel compressive shock

A. Can be caused by pericardial tamponade

B. May accompany tension pneumothorax

C. Is worsened by the need for positive pressure ventilation

D. Cannot be caused by intra-abdominal injury

E. All of A, B, and C

E. All of A, B, and C

The pulmonary failure of shock, trauma, and sepsis

A. Can be related to products of coagulation and inflammation that are washed out from the damaged tissues

B. Can be effectively treated with a combination of antibiotics and corticosteroids

C. Is always related to systemic infection

D. Is caused by a decrease in pulmonary vascular permeability

E. Both A and C

A. Can be related to products of coagulation and inflammation that are washed out from the damaged tissues

All of the following are true about pressure support ventilation, except

A. PSV is a pressure-limited ventilator mode

B. PSV includes a set inspiratory time

C. PSV breaths are patient-triggered

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