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Injury to the spleen is one of the more serious problems associated with trauma. Emergently there is the possibility of exsanguination. However, for the remainder of the patient's life after splenectomy, there is the possibility of catastrophic bacterial infection with encapsulated organisms, such as pneumococci, especially in the very young. This has stimulated clinicians to conserve the spleen with or without operation. Nonoperative treatment in children is often successful if careful monitoring is provided in-hospital and thereafter at home until full healing is documented. Additionally, in adults as well as in children, splenorrhaphy is often possible, as it is desirable to salvage as much of the traumatized spleen as possible. It is uncertain how much retained spleen is essential to provide normal protection for the patient, but many recommend preservation of half or more if possible. The surgeon must appreciate that it is essential to control exsanguination and that total splenectomy should be performed for splenic fractures that are massive or that cannot be easily controlled in the presence of continued major hemorrhage.

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Rib fractures (especially those in the left lower and posterior region) and an elevated left diaphragm on roentgenograms of the chest are suggestive of splenic injury. Abdominal CT scans are invaluable in demonstrating splenic injury and their findings may support a decision for or against immediate splenectomy. Early operation should be considered when the scan shows a fracture that extends into the hilum of the spleen. The patient with splenic injury who is managed with observation must be evaluated frequently as occult hemorrhage may result in sudden hypotension and shock. The decision for or against nonsurgical treatment of a splenic injury should be based upon clinical judgment rather than solely on radiographic findings. If the diagnosis is not clear, a peritoneal tap or lavage yielding an obviously bloody return can be helpful in supporting surgical intervention as this indicates a free or noncontained rupture of the spleen.

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Familiarity with the major blood supply of the spleen is required if salvage of the portion of the spleen is to be successful (Figure 1). ...

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